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An Introduction to Python
by Guido van Rossum and Fred L. Drake, Jr.
Paperback (6"x9"), 124 pages
ISBN 0954161769
RRP £12.95 ($19.95)

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4.3 The range() Function

If you do need to iterate over a sequence of numbers, the built-in function range() comes in handy. It generates lists containing arithmetic progressions:

    >>> range(10)
    [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

The given end point is never part of the generated list; range(10) generates a list of 10 values, the legal indices for items of a sequence of length 10. It is possible to let the range start at another number, or to specify a different increment (even negative; sometimes this is called the `step'):

    >>> range(5, 10)
    [5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
    >>> range(0, 10, 3)
    [0, 3, 6, 9]
    >>> range(-10, -100, -30)
    [-10, -40, -70]

To iterate over the indices of a sequence, combine range() and len() as follows:

    >>> a = ['Mary', 'had', 'a', 'little', 'lamb']
    >>> for i in range(len(a)):
    ...     print i, a[i]
    ... 
    0 Mary
    1 had
    2 a
    3 little
    4 lamb
ISBN 0954161769An Introduction to PythonSee the print edition